Remember, They Only Abduct In Rural Places…

New Books Promotion

Take a wild ride in a flying saucer. And keep your eyes to the skies.

Self Promoting Your Books With Very Little $$$

I’ve had people who are on a tight budget say they are having trouble self-promoting their books. So I thought I would pass on some of the stuff I’ve been doing, and I hope it helps you.

First, I want to say I can’t track my results. Since I have a publisher, I can’t get to the tracking page on Amazon to see if anything I do is helping. But, I DO know it’s better than not doing anything at all. If you don’t get the word out there about your book(s) then how will people know about them.

1. Give copies to your local libraries. They love to support local authors and get free books. I gave a copy to my local town and Dallas. I still have three or four others within 20 miles I can provide a copy to. Keep copies in your car as you travel, even on vacation. You might spot a library in a new city to leave one at.

2. Don’t be afraid to talk about your book to people. You may never know who might be interested in purchasing a copy. (Another good reason to have copies in your car.)

I mentioned to the manager at our local Outback Restaurant that my book was out, and he bought a copy. A few weeks later at our next visit, he mentioned my book to my server, and she bought a copy (again, I have a half dozen copies in the car waiting). Easy ten bucks earned.

3. I haven’t tried this yet, but I have seen authors signing and selling copies of their books at Walmart. I’ve heard Kroger even allow you to set up a table to sign and sell.

4. Also, check with your local bookstores. Several have book signings monthly. My local bookstore is selling copies of my book for me, just to support me. Half-Price Books also allowed me to set up a table to sell copies. (Funny thing, my local Barnes & Noble told me they weren’t big enough to hold book signings. Not big enough? Come on, have you ever seen a small Barnes & Noble?)

5. Keep business cards on hand to hand out. You never know who might be interested in your book. And don’t be afraid to leave them around. I’ve placed some on top of gas pumps before. As well as in bathrooms at office buildings, high-rises, and restaurants. Bookstores and other stores often allow you to leave cards on their counters. Also, keep an eye out for bulletin boards.

6. There are a lot of Facebook groups for promoting your books. Sometimes on a daily basis. I have a list of over 100 groups I usually post to weekly. I don’t do daily because people will get tired and maybe block you. (Don’t you get bored seeing the same commercial during every commercial break?) I usually post between Tuesdays because it stands the chance of being read on those days. Also, on Mondays people usually spend time deleting the emails they received over the weekend without reading them, and on Fridays they are generally busy with the weekend on their minds.

7. Think about adding a link to your author’s page or the book’s page at the end of your posts with a tagline. Something like this…

Take a wild ride in a flying saucer!

www.amazon.com/dp/1701788128 


Saucer Chase

saucer chase

The following is from chapter 3 of “Invasion USA!” from The Jupiter Factor Series

Jack Slater has just learn how to operate the flying saucer he found in the abandoned alien base and decides to have some fun…

He decided then to take a joy ride. He pressed an area of the panel in front of him to view the tunnel exit to make sure the coast was clear. No one was around, so he was safe to leave. He was about to leave when he stopped, wondering about how could he control the speed. He then realized the helmet would calibrate the saucer’s speed into human terms of measurements. He would think what miles per hour he wanted to travel and the craft would quickly reach that speed. He reached for the pad to start recording what he was doing. He first recorded what had happened and what he had learned. After he had finished, he decided to take a ride.

“Hover at 5 feet and retract the landing gears,” the saucer started a soft humming noise as it hovered, the landing struts disappearing into it.

“Exit tunnel at five miles an hour,” he noticed he didn’t sense any movement as the saucer began moving forward into the tunnel.

The tunnel lit in front of him as the saucer glided through it. Just before the exit, he could see sunlight filling the passageway as the doors opened. As the saucer flew through the opening, he noticed he still had enough room on all sides for larger crafts to use.

“Hover and level off,” the saucer stopped ten feet above ground as the tunnel door closed below it.

Using the helmet screen, he looked around and still saw nobody. Not knowing what the saucer’s top speed was, and what kind of g-force it could create, he decided to proceed slowly at first.

He gained altitude to one hundred feet above the tree line and quickly accelerated to fifty miles per hour away from OSAP. He still didn’t feel any movement. He increased speed to one hundred miles per hour and felt nothing. The saucer sped through the air; staying at the same altitude.

“Okay, it’s time for some fun,” he thought. The saucer quickly accelerated to one thousand miles per hour and shot into the sky. It only took it a few seconds to reach the altitude of five thousand feet he had decided on in his head. The saucer was almost quicker than thought, or was it faster? He would have to be careful with that helmet on his head. Very careful.

Jack didn’t feel the acceleration or the altitude change. He figured the saucer must have inertial dampeners and be able to create its own gravity.

An area on the panel in front of him flashed red, and then a screen activated on the panel when the proximity alert triggered. He was wondering if he was close to the DFW Airport’s traffic when he noticed two Air Force jet fighters heading his way.

He quickly gained altitude to 30,000 feet, leaving the jets behind. He hovered for several seconds to get his bearings while watching the fighters turn and close in on his position.

“It’s time for a game of tag,” he said aloud.

The saucer sped toward the two jets, passing between them. It stopped and changed direction to follow the aircraft from the rear. The fighters veered off in separate directions, one to the left and the other to the right and up. The jet to the right was trying to loop around to get behind the saucer. For the next several minutes Jack had the saucer circle the jets, outdistancing them and looping back at them.

“Fun’s over,” he thought to himself, “time to get back to work.”

Not wanting the fighters to follow him back to headquarters and figuring they couldn’t reach Mach 5, he decided to go to 50,000 feet at Mach 15. He knew the saucer could easily do it…

Invasion USA!

Jack Slater has chased UFOs most of his life.  Now he’s found one, and he’s ready to unlock its secrets.  Only one small issue complicates matters–a planet-wide war.

Invasion USA!, book 1 from The Jupiter Factor Series is available at Amazon.

Source: Invasion USA!